Charting slipped stitches – Stitchmastery weekly tip

Charting slipped stitches – Stitchmastery weekly tip


Recently we were asked about creating
customized stitches to denote stitches which are slipped over a few
rows. It’s not possible to create any symbols in Stitchmastery that are more
than one cell or row high, and the reason for this is that Stitchmastery is very
much working row by row both to generate the output text (so row by row written
instructions) and also for the maths for each row – so things like, if you add in an
extra increase in a row and don’t add a corresponding decrease or increase the
number of stitches in your next row, then you get an error message. So Stitchmastery is calculating each row to make sure that it makes sense and is workable.
[I’ll just tidy that stitch back up]. But we have a couple of different options for
representing a slip stitch – so first, in the Basic Stitches drawer we have the
slip stitch and slip purl wise with yarn in front – so we could add those in here
and you just stack them up as many times as you like. And as you’ll see in the
written instructions (we begin in row 6) slip with white and then row 7 we
have the slip with white. And of course if this was colourwork, you could always
add in the colour of the stitches to demonstrate that that colour is coming up over the other colourwork. Some people might not like the look of the
individual V’s, so the other alternative is in the Brioche Stitches drawer. If
you scroll down you’ll see a couple of symbols which are used for slightly
different things in brioche, but which could be used to demonstrate a slip
stitch. So for instance if we pop these just a few of them or indeed … so
this particular symbol, as you can see, it doesn’t quite fill the whole cell, but
the one below does… so you see that those lines join up and you might prefer the
look of that, so that it’s clear that the stitches are connected. Of course if
you’re using these you will probably want to change the key description and
the abbreviations for going in the written instructions so that they
actually say exactly what you mean to be done. I will link to a couple of videos below that show how to change key entries and how to customize stitches. I will also link to a couple of articles from Kate Artherley from our blog, where she talks about
different types of slip stitch designs, and hopefully those might be helpful for
you too.

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