Knitting Tutorial – Sidewalk Talk Flip-Flop Socks

Knitting Tutorial – Sidewalk Talk Flip-Flop Socks


In this video, I’m going to run through the
techniques used in my new pattern for flip-flop socks, it’s called sidewalk talk flip-flop
socks. Something kind of fun and different for us,
sock knitters. If you’d like to get your copy of the pattern
to follow along, just click the little i, in the upper right-hand corner, to go to my
website, there’ll be more information there. This is an intermediate sock pattern. I really highly suggest that you have some
sock-knitting experience before you give this a try. They’re just kind of the extra thing of the
split between the toes, is maybe too much for someone who’s never knit socks before. But if you’d like to give socks a try and
they’re brand new to you, I’ll give you a link here to the tutorial and pattern that
I recommend for brand-new sock knitters, that’ll get you started. Then if you wanna knit these, you can make
them your second pair of socks that you knit. But knit those first, and then you can get
into something like this. These are sized for women of average foot
width, any shoe size. And I’ve actually put in two sizes… I mean, you can knit any shoe size, of course,
but I’ve put in two sets of instructions for regular toes and longer toes. I actually designed these for myself and realized
that they weren’t gonna fit everyone because I have long toes, so I had to make it for
regular toes and longer toes. But how to measure and all that information
is on my website and, of course, in the pattern. This uses regular old-sock yarn, fingering-weight
yarn. And you can use a whole 100-gram hank to make
crew socks, but I also have instructions in there for little shorty socks, and I’ll give
you a close-up look at those in the next section. These are knit toe up using Judy’s magic cast
on. I’ve never actually used Judy’s magic cast
on in a sock pattern before, so this is the first time. They’re knit toe up with a German short row
heel. Really, once you get past the toes section,
that’s just a normal pair of socks, you know. You can wear them like normal socks or you
can wear them with flip-flops. Yeah, they’re really just normal socks once
you get past the toes. So regular sock yarn, sized for women, average
foot width. What else did I wanna say? Intermediate pattern. Well, if I forgot anything, I’ll be sure to
get it in the next section. Oh, no, I know what I want to say. We’re going to use Judy’s magic cast on, which
means that we’re going to start these socks using magic loop. And if you’re a magic loop knitter, that’s
great, you can just keep going with magic loop for the rest of the sock. But if you, you know, as an experienced sock
knitter, if you want to go ahead and switch to your preferred method for knitting socks,
like I finished the toe on magic loop and then I switched to nine-inch circulars because
that’s my jam right now, you can knit it however your favorite way of knitting socks is, once
we get past the toes, that’s it. I think it’s the last thing I wanted to say. Yes. If I forgot something else, I’ll say it in
a minute, in the next section, where we get started with the cast on. You have your yarn. This is the kind of yarn that everyone has,
a hank of somewhere in their house, right? Just regular old sock yarn. You have your yarn, your needles, your pattern,
we are ready to get started. Before we do the cast on, let’s get a close-up
look at socks. Okay, these are a pair I knit just out of
regular sock yarn. Of course, they’re all out of regular sock
yarn, I don’t know why I said that. But I knit this kind of a crew sock length,
and we have this split between the toes. And then, these, I have instructions for how
to make these…exactly how to do the heel section because these are little shorty socks,
kind of like Japanese tubby socks. And I need to weigh these. I will give that information on my website
and in the pattern, exactly how much yarn these use because you can definitely get a
couple of pair of these out of a 100 grams of sock yarn. Because they’re just little shorty socks,
they don’t use much yarn. Okay, let’s go ahead and get started with
Judy’s magic cast on. I am going to be using much bigger yarn and
needles for this demonstration so that you can see what I’m doing really well. And we have to start on magic loop. I’m using a 32-inch circular needle. I’m going to start with a slipknot, but I’m
not going to leave a whole lot of tail. Okay. Got my… I think I’ve got this upside down. No. Okay. Okay. I’ve got my tail end here and my working yarn
up here, I’m gonna hold the two needles together facing to the left and I’m going to set myself
up like I’m doing a slingshot cast on. And I wanna cast on, for this demonstration,
I wanna cast on five stitches on each needle, and this is Judy’s magic cast on. I already have one stitch, on the back needle,
which is my slipknot. I wanna get a stitch here, on the front needle,
and the way that I do that is I swing both needles up past the yarn, on my index finger,
grab that between the needles and now I have two. And now I wanna put a stitch on the top needle
again. I go past the yarn on my thumb, grab that
yarn between the two needles, and there we go. This is not a sturdy cast on, but it’s pretty
cool the way it works. Past, grab it with the bottom needle, past,
grab it with the top needle. Okay. And if you want a really slow long explanation
of Judy’s magic cast on, I will give you a link here to my video on…it’s a longer video
on this technique. Now what we have here is really unstable,
but not for long. I’m going to turn the work, so my needles
are facing to the right. And because this cast on doesn’t have knots
on, you know, holding the stitches down or anything, everything’s kind of loosey-goosey. I’m going to wrap the working yarn and the
tail end together. And I’m going to pull out this back needle. And then knit across the stitches. I don’t know why I’m holding the tail end
with my left hand, not necessary. Okay. I’m gonna turn the work and get myself back
into the magic loop starting position, pull the back needle long, and then knit across
the stitches on the front needle. I’m gonna wanna shorten that tail too because
that’s gonna drive me nuts. Oh, I wanted to back up and explain something. This first needle stitch that I knit is the
slipknot and now all of the rest of stitches, on this side, are twisted, so we’re going
to knit them through the back loop. Okay. And turn the work. Everything’s a little more stable now that
we’ve actually worked around. And I’m going to give the tail-end a tug to
tighten things up a little bit. Okay. Now I’m gonna start the increases, and both
the big toe and the little toe piece, I worked exactly the same, just more stitches on one
than the other. I’m going to knit across to the last stitch
and then KFB, which is knit front back. I do a normal knit stitch, leave that loop
on the left needle, swing the tip of the needle into the back loop of that stitch, wrap it
and pull it through. And I just increased by one. Turn the work. And then the first stitch of the second side,
I’m going to KFB here as well. Okay. And I’m at the beginning of my round because
my tail-end is here. And you’re gonna work that increase every
other round following the pattern for the piece you’re knitting and the number. I wanna work one more round to show you. Because this is really different from other
sock tutorials that I have out because we don’t normally start at the tippy toe like
we do with these. We normally start kind of at the base of the
toes and work our way around. So this is kind of a different sock beginning
and I have some tight stitches. There we go. Now, when you’re knitting this, what I have
is a flat piece. But it happens, eventually, the piece starts
to want to fold up on itself. Go ahead and let it because that will actually
give you the shape of the toe. Okay. So every other round you’re going to KFB and,
of course, that’s written out row by row in the pattern. Okay. Then what you have are a separate big toe
and a little toe piece. And again, I have knit these huge, these are
enormous Sasquatch socks that don’t fit anyone, so that I can demonstrate to you so you can
see what I’m doing. So when I finish the big toes, or a big toe
piece, I slip those stitches to double-pointed needles, just to kind of hang on to them,
I’m going to knit off of the double-pointed needles onto the circular needles. I knit this second, so this is still on the
needle with the working yarn attached, and we’re gonna combine everything onto one needle. Now, I’m actually going to look at my instructions
as I do this because this is the fiddly part to create the section between the toes. First thing I’m going to do is to tink back
two stitches. And that means to unknit two stitches. Tink back two stitches and I’m going to put
those two stitches on scrap yarn. Just slide those on scrap yarn. And I like to use a wool-sock yarn so it has
some grip to it, so it’s not gonna slide out. These are really enormous stitches though. Excuse me. Okay. Then switching to the big toe piece, I am
going to tink back one stitch and then slip that stitch back on the needle. And the working yarn is going to be coming
from the second stitch from the end there. And then I’m going to take another piece of
scrap yarn and slip the first two stitches onto the scrap yarn. Okay. So we have all of these tinking scrap yarn,
everything. Now it’s time to combine them. I have my working yarn coming from the little
toe piece here. Just ignore everything is flopping around
with needles and scrap yarn and everything, just focus on your working yarn and your next
stitch, my next stitch of the big toe pieces. You’re going to follow the pattern to knit
the number that it says. And I have these written out really clearly,
in the pattern, I promise you, this part. Actually, I have it printed out big for myself
right now, so I can see. And when you get to the halfway point, we’re
gonna turn the work which, in magic loop, means we’re gonna pull the needle long and
knit across the second half of the stitches. Things are getting tidier as I drop double-pointed
needles here. Okay. I have two stitches left, on the big toe piece,
and I want to slip these to the same piece of scrap yarn that I had, what I started the
round with. So rethread that. And without knitting them, I’m gonna slip
those onto there. So I have four stitches on scrap yarn on the
big toes piece, and now we jump over here to the little toes piece. I’m going to take the scrap yarn that I have
going here and slip those first two stitches of scrap yarn. Okay. So, all of that done, we have the stitches
between the toes. Four stitches on the little-toes piece, four
stitches on the big-toes piece, all on scrap yarn. And they’re held, and we’re gonna get back
to them in a few minutes. For now, I’m going to knit to the end of the
round. [00:14:29]
[Silence] [00:14:54] Okay. And now, I wanna mark this spot as the beginning
of my round and that’s gonna make a difference as we do the heel. But really, at this point, everything’s combined,
everything is kind of loosey-goosey but it’s gonna tighten up as you work subsequent rounds. And we’re going to tighten all this up with
Kitchener stitch, and we can put a couple of little stitches in here to tighten it up,
I’m gonna show you that here in just a minute. But mark this as the beginning of your round
and, right now, you can switch to whatever your preferred method of knitting socks is. You can stay on magic loop, you can switch
to nine-inch circulars, you can go to double-pointed needles, two circulars. Whatever it is you like, you can switch to
that now because you’re just going to be knitting the length of the foot. Okay. Now I got past that, that was the most complicated
part. Let me see what the next section is. And I think I wanna show you the Kitchener
stitch now. Okay. Again, Sasquatch sock. And this is what I have been doing in the
pairs that I have knit of these is I knit a few rounds, maybe a few inches, and then
I go in and work the Kitchener stitch on the space between the toes. It’s just easier to do it before the whole
sock is finished, I think. So I’m going to slip one side of the held
stitches onto a double-pointed needle and take out the scrap yarn. And the other side. And if you’ve worked Kitchener stitch, it’s
pretty self-explanatory with just one little difference. Okay. We left a long tail on the big-toes piece
for a reason. Get that threaded and take a look at this. I’m going to be Kitchener stitching these
together but I’m looking at the space right under the needles, there’s a gap there. And this is pretty normal. Anytime you change direction of your knitting,
you know, whether you’re knitting a raglan sweater, or heels of socks, or whatever, you
can get a gap there. And all I’m going to do is just put in a couple
of little stitches. Nothing fancy, just grabbing something that
looks sturdy. And I’ve tightened that all up and you’ll
see, when I do the Kitchener stitch here, that it does actually look really good. So I’m going to purl my set-up rows, purl
on the front, knit on the back, leave those on. And then my chant for the Kitchener stitch,
you’ve watched my videos before, is front-needle, knit off, purl, back needle, purl off, knit. And if you need a review of the Kitchener
stitch, I’ll give you a link here to my video on Kitchener stitch. Knit off, purl, purl off, knit. Knit off, purl, purl off, knit. And then knit off, purl off. Tighten that up. You can tighten it up really tight and then
stretch it back out again so that… That’s what I like to do so there are no gaps,
I know there are no gaps. And then on the other side, our working yarn
is over here. On the other side, I’m gonna do the same thing
and just a couple of tiny quick stitches to tighten up this space. Okay. And that is the space between the toes, all
tidy and neat. And whoops, I can actually tighten that up
a little better. I didn’t weave in the end here, so it looks
a little loose. Actually, I’m not happy with the way that
one looks. You can watch me redo things, I do this all
the time where I stitch things up and I’m like, “Ah, that’s pulling,” or, “Ah, that
doesn’t look quite right.” I’m not happy with the way that stitch looked,
so I took it out and we’ll redo it. It’s really gonna show up in this, in this
worsted weight yarn anyway. That’s better. Okay, all tidy. Let me see, check my list here. “Kitchener scrap yarn, tapestry needle.” Okay. We finished the toes piece. So you followed the directions to knit the
length of a foot for the size of the shoe that you’re knitting, and then it’ll tell
you exactly when to stop knitting. And next up, we’re going to cover the German
short-row heel. When you finish the foot of your sock, you’re
ready to start the heel. We’re doing a German short-row heel, and if
you’ve knit any of my socks that have German short-row heels, same techniques, just follow
the instructions on the pattern for the numbers and everything like that. But I’m gonna show you the technique here
and I am going to switch… Well, I’ll explain it, let’s take a look. Here is my Sasquatch sock and I’m just about
at the end of my round. I’m gonna take out the stitch marker, that’s
the end of my round. I’m actually going to knit the heel on double-pointed
needles. And the heel is just a little bit of knitting,
I’m gonna let the other stitches just hang out on the nine-inch circular while I do this. And this is my preferred method for knitting
a heel, you do anything you want. I think it also works well for demonstration,
which is why I’m doing it. So you knit the number of stitches. And I knew while I was putting this sample
together that I would be talking and not counting, so I put a stitch marker end for myself so
that I could talk and not count and not worry about it. But you will want to count because the left
and right sock, they’re different, the heel lands in a different spot. Okay. And now, we’re ready to work a German short
row. I’m going to turn the work, slip that stitch
from left to right, pull up on the stitch, and yarn forward to purl across. Whoops. [00:22:14]
[Silence] [00:22:33] My double-pointed needle keeps hitting that
work surface. Okay. I knit up to the spot. On the purl side, turn the work. Untangle everything, of course, slip that
stitch from left to the right needle. Then my working yarn, I pulled it forward,
I’m going to pull up on that, kind of smash that stitch, and then knit to the next stitch. And I have this written out, row-by-row, with
the exact numbers. [00:23:21]
[Silence] [00:23:40] Okay. I knit up to that spot. The pattern tells me, “Turn the work, slip
that stitch from left to right, pull up on the stitch, and yarn forward to purl.” Whoops. [00:23:57]
[Silence] [00:24:27] Okay, I purled up this spot. Turn the work, yarn forward, slip that stitch
from left to right, pull up on it, and then knit to the next spot. And that is the technique used on the first
half of the heel. And now, I’m going to show you how to work
the second half of the heel. I’m going to knit up to the first German short-row
stitch, we call it a double-stitch, it looks like a double stitch, it has two strands. Here we go. I’m gonna knit those two stitches together
and the next one, or the next double stitches together, turn the work, and then work a German
short-row, and then purl up to the first double stitch. [00:25:29]
[Silence] [00:25:56] And when I hit that, I’m gonna purl those
two halves and stitch together and the next one. And then turn the work and work a German short
row. So those are the techniques used in the heel. You just follow the pattern for the exact
number to knit and once you finish all of the instructions for the heel, you can just
resume knitting the cuff of the sock however you want, you know, whatever technique you
were using before if you wanna switch it up again. And, you know, for me, I would be switching
back to the nine-inch circulars, I would just knit off of the double-pointed needle onto
the nine-inch circular and keep going. And when I do, also, changing directions,
just like we did with the Kitchener stitch between the toes. I usually like to pick up a couple of stitches
in the gap, between the heel and the rest of the stitches, and then on the next round,
decrease those stitches out. And that keeps there from being a gap in the
work where you’ve changed direction in your knitting. And actually, I have a whole video on that. If you want more detail on that, I’ll give
you a link here to that video. And that is it. Those are the techniques used in sidewalk
talk flip-flop socks, something fun. I hope you guys enjoy the pattern. Good luck.

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