Thread Tension – Simplified

Thread Tension – Simplified


Hi, It’s Monica with It’s Just Sewing. Today I want to talk to you about something that really frustrates people who sew whether they’ve been sewing for a few weeks or
twenty years. That’s thread tension so thread tension can seem really complicated and frustrating so I’m going to break it down for
you in a way that they just make it simpler and make it more digestible to start off with. Especially if you are
new to sewing so the first thing I want to show you is where your thread tension dial is
located. I’m sure you all know but it’s right up here for a newer machines
and be right out here. It Usually goes all the way from
a zero, Down to a Zero and up to a Nine you’ll notice as you go higher up with your
machine that’s just getting tighter so keep that in mind. Go ahead and
set it right in the middle at about four-and-a-half. If you
have an old vintage machine typically what you see
is the thread tension dial it can be front and center, and out for display, not tucked
into the machines that’s kinda knob that sits right up front. Alright so, how to
identify issues with thread tension, normally you the
start sewing and you look at your stitch line you’re going to see your stitch line and here’s your stitches
they look beautiful. And your saying “I love It”. And you turn it on the backside and it looks the same – BEAUTIFUL. Alright, so that’s not always the case unfortunately
and sometimes what you’ll see is and you will see one side looking
loose or loopy and other side is really
tight or when you’re sewing and your running your fabric through you’ll notice that and the material
looks a little bit wavy. That’s a sign of thread tension issues and also if you and so if you look at the back side and
there is a line a threat it almost like most like a railroad tie where you’ll see threads
going over it. That’s an issue possible thread tension as
well. Thread tension issues mainly have to do with the thinness and thickness of of fabrics so we’re going to use two
extremes were talking about this today. So in in the class that I have taught, the Basic Sewing Class in past, we always use this analogy and I think it’s really helpful. So
imagine that on one side you have really thick I layers a
flannel or fleece, let’s use fleece. Thick Layers of fleece, and the other extreme I have really thin wedding veil
material like Tulle, very very fine. So you can
imagine that you are working with multiple layers of fleece your are going to need your tension to be less tense to get through all those layers.
Right? Because, otherwise if you’re working on something that’s really thick and you’re using tighter thread
tension what happens is your material your project is a look pierced from the stitches that are going through.
So, it’s going to bunch in and you don’t want that obviously don’t want
that had a look. So what you’re gonna do is lower the
number on the thread tension dial lessen that your thread tension. Now I think this is highly
counter intuitive because it’s thicker the number should be higher
right? No, totally not the case and it took me a long time before I finally really got that. So you wanna make
sure that you’re dialing down your thread tension to go through multiple layers of fleece.
Okay, so conversely if you’re using that thin wedding veil material you can
imagine if you’re using a standard threat tension it still looks super
loose going through all of it. And not look like a very secure stitch. And you’re gonna have flaws in it and it’s going to look horrible. What you wanna do is you want to
tighten, or go UP in number with your tension so those
are the most basic examples that I can
gave you in terms of using your thread tension dial.
That said with new machines the thread tension dial is AWESOME,
because it actually factors in a little wiggle room for you so you don’t have to do a huge amount of
correction unless you’re working with extremes. How cool is that, right? The the one thing though that can happen is
you see those things and you’ll think ‘it’s an issue with thread tension’. But it may not be, so the other reasons that that you’ll have issues
with your stitches that look like thread tension could be a
couple things. The first one is ALWAYS, ALWAYS have the right bobbin for your machine because if you
don’t, it’s going to look like thread tension issues. The Othe thing is you want to
make sure that when you get your bobbin into your bobbin
casing whether it is and a drop in or front-loaded you need
to make sure your bobbin is going n the
correct way because it isn’t, it is gonna look like that
railroad tie issue that we talked about earlier. So
those are the two things that you need to make sure that you do. And the third, you know I preach it, you gotta make sure that your bobbin looks awesome because it you’re bobbin looks like a total disaster
before you put it into your bobbin casing, you are going to have a hideous stitch line and there’s no way around
that. So, those your trouble shooters with thread
tension and again we just touched on it. I always say we start out don’t work
with things that stretch. Because what I just taught you about thread tention changes
considerably when you’re working with knits. So keep that in mind! Flannel, cotton, quilting cotton, Canvas, Denim. those are all types of materials that are
going to ease you into working with thread tension as you’re going forward. Then when you get
really comfortable with that, start in with the knits. It’s a perfect segway after that. all right to set
yourself up to succeed and remember as always to follow our channel subscribe to our newsletter, we always send out great tutorials and information. Of Course, you can also follow us on social
media { it’s just sewing}. Now, BE FEARLESS – We’ll see you soon! Bye

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